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AIM Study: Consumers Step Up To Hair Care Appliances That Assist Styling Versatility

CHICAGO— Many personal care vendors in the housewares industry have proceeded with their product development efforts and marketing initiatives on evidence that consumers are regularly changing their looks, shifting to home-based means to do so and willing to pay a bit more for products that help them get the hair styles and grooming preferences they want.

HOMEWORLD BUSINESS®, with the help of Albing International Marketing, decided to explore that hypothesis. When asked in a consumer study conducted earlier this year, a substantial proportion of respondents, 41.3%, said they did indeed regularly change hair styles or, when applicable, facial hair grooming regularly. About a third of men reported changing styles regularly but almost half of women said they updated their looks as a matter of course. 

When broken down generationally, only about a quarter of consumers 49 to 59 years old reported updating their looks regularly, but almost half of those associated with the Millennial generation, ages 22 to 32 for purposes of the study, and Gen X, ages 33 to 48, reported doing so.

How often consumers change their look may vary. However, the place where any transformation occurs is more consistent. In the study, 75.7% of consumers reported changing looks at home with a grooming tool and just under a quarter at a salon. In an interesting result, men and women responded consistently when asked where they changed their looks. In fact, men were only just slightly more likely to make a change at home than women, with the separation as slim as half of a percentage point, the survey indicated.

Age made little difference either, although Boomers were somewhat more likely to seek professional help changing their looks.

The majority of consumers prefer grooming products that are designed for all-purpose use but a significant proportion, just shy of 40%, prefer specialized products. Women pretty much were split evenly when it comes to preference, but men, at slightly over 70%, are fans of products that can do the full range of jobs required. 

Perhaps because of economic circumstances or because they have not yet become too fussy about their appearance, Millennials have a stronger preference for all-purpose grooming tools. Respondents 22 to 32 years of age, at 69%, had a stronger preference for utility products than did those 33 to 48, at 53.5% or those 49 to 59, at 58.2%.

Just because consumers lean toward general purpose tools doesn’t mean they’re necessarily skimping on the products they use to style hair, beard or mustache. When asked if they would spend more than $50 for a grooming tool, 58.7% of consumers said they would. Indeed, two thirds of women and half of men said they would spend $50 for a styling tool, with younger consumers being particularly prone to invest. Just under two thirds of consumers 22 to 32 and those 33 to 48 would spend more than $50. Baby Boomers seemed more reluctant to spend. Only 43.9% of survey respondents 49 to 59 said they would spend more than $50.

In an interesting turn, a large number of consumers would spend more than $50 on any sort of grooming tool. A plurality responding to a question about what kind of tool would rate a $50 purchase said it could come out of either the general purpose or task-specific category. At the same time 15.7% of consumers said they would spend more than $50 on a general purpose tool and 15% on a task-specific tool. A third of consumers said they wouldn’t spend more than $50 on any sort of grooming tool at all.

As regards gender, men were a bit more likely than women to spend more than $50 on a specialty tool. Many more women, 18.1% versus 11.7%, would put down $50 on a specialty tool than men. Just around a third of both would spend more then $50 on either variety of grooming tool, with women a bit more eager, and a little under a third would not spend that kind of money on either. Women were a little less likely to keep purchases under the $50 threshold than were men.

Younger consumers leaned more toward spending $50 on grooming tools when compared to Baby Boomers, with 50.5% in the oldest of the three age brackets studied saying they would not spend larger amounts on either. Yet consumers 49 to 59 who are inclined to spend more than average tended to be enthusiastic, with 33% saying they would spend more then $50 on either general-purpose or specialized products.

As for younger consumers, nearly three quarters of those 33 to 48 would spend more than $50 on a tool, with general purpose products generating the least purchase enthusiasm. Yet, almost a quarter of consumers 22 to 32 would spend over $50 on a general purpose tool and 35.6% said they would spend more than both. Just over three quarters of consumers ages 22 to 42 would spend more than $50 on a grooming tool, the study demonstrated.

CHICAGO— Many personal care vendors in the housewares industry have proceeded with their product development efforts and marketing initiatives on evidence that consumers are regularly changing their looks, shifting to home-based means to do so and willing to pay a bit more for products that help them get the hair styles and grooming preferences they want.

HOMEWORLD BUSINESS®, with the help of Albing International Marketing, decided to explore that hypothesis. When asked in a consumer study conducted earlier this year, a substantial proportion of respondents, 41.3%, said they did indeed regularly change hair styles or, when applicable, facial hair grooming regularly. About a third of men reported changing styles regularly but almost half of women said they updated their looks as a matter of course. 

When broken down generationally, only about a quarter of consumers 49 to 59 years old reported updating their looks regularly, but almost half of those associated with the Millennial generation, ages 22 to 32 for purposes of the study, and Gen X, ages 33 to 48, reported doing so.

How often consumers change their look may vary. However, the place where any transformation occurs is more consistent. In the study, 75.7% of consumers reported changing looks at home with a grooming tool and just under a quarter at a salon. In an interesting result, men and women responded consistently when asked where they changed their looks. In fact, men were only just slightly more likely to make a change at home than women, with the separation as slim as half of a percentage point, the survey indicated.

Age made little difference either, although Boomers were somewhat more likely to seek professional help changing their looks.

The majority of consumers prefer grooming products that are designed for all-purpose use but a significant proportion, just shy of 40%, prefer specialized products. Women pretty much were split evenly when it comes to preference, but men, at slightly over 70%, are fans of products that can do the full range of jobs required. 

Perhaps because of economic circumstances or because they have not yet become too fussy about their appearance, Millennials have a stronger preference for all-purpose grooming tools. Respondents 22 to 32 years of age, at 69%, had a stronger preference for utility products than did those 33 to 48, at 53.5% or those 49 to 59, at 58.2%.

Just because consumers lean toward general purpose tools doesn’t mean they’re necessarily skimping on the products they use to style hair, beard or mustache. When asked if they would spend more than $50 for a grooming tool, 58.7% of consumers said they would. Indeed, two thirds of women and half of men said they would spend $50 for a styling tool, with younger consumers being particularly prone to invest. Just under two thirds of consumers 22 to 32 and those 33 to 48 would spend more than $50. Baby Boomers seemed more reluctant to spend. Only 43.9% of survey respondents 49 to 59 said they would spend more than $50.

In an interesting turn, a large number of consumers would spend more than $50 on any sort of grooming tool. A plurality responding to a question about what kind of tool would rate a $50 purchase said it could come out of either the general purpose or task-specific category. At the same time 15.7% of consumers said they would spend more than $50 on a general purpose tool and 15% on a task-specific tool. A third of consumers said they wouldn’t spend more than $50 on any sort of grooming tool at all.

As regards gender, men were a bit more likely than women to spend more than $50 on a specialty tool. Many more women, 18.1% versus 11.7%, would put down $50 on a specialty tool than men. Just around a third of both would spend more then $50 on either variety of grooming tool, with women a bit more eager, and a little under a third would not spend that kind of money on either. Women were a little less likely to keep purchases under the $50 threshold than were men.

Younger consumers leaned more toward spending $50 on grooming tools when compared to Baby Boomers, with 50.5% in the oldest of the three age brackets studied saying they would not spend larger amounts on either. Yet consumers 49 to 59 who are inclined to spend more than average tended to be enthusiastic, with 33% saying they would spend more then $50 on either general-purpose or specialized products.

As for younger consumers, nearly three quarters of those 33 to 48 would spend more than $50 on a tool, with general purpose products generating the least purchase enthusiasm. Yet, almost a quarter of consumers 22 to 32 would spend over $50 on a general purpose tool and 35.6% said they would spend more than both. Just over three quarters of consumers ages 22 to 42 would spend more than $50 on a grooming tool, the study demonstrated.